"Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences are usually the slaves of some defunct economist." — John Maynard Keynes, quoted by Paul Krugman, New York Times (7 May 2006)

General

  • France vs. England: Mid-nineteenth-century trade and economic theory
  • Mid-Victorian England's Industrial Dominance
  • How Victorians Invested Capital
  • The Victorian Invention of the Modern Company
  • Bankruptcy in Victorian England — Threat or Myth?
  • "For Godsake be done with railways and shares!" — the Railway Panics of the 1840s
  • The Railway Mania of the 1840s
  • The Bank of England and the London Money Market in the Nineteenth Century
  • Abandonment and Restoration of the Gold Standard
  • The Anti-Technological Bias of Victorian Education and Britain's Economic Decline
  • Victorian Bank Accounts as Material for Research
  • The Racist Origins of the Idea that Economics was "the Dismal Science"
  • Malthus, Mill, Carlyle, Marx, and Economics as a “Dismal Science”
  • Currency, Wages, and the Cost of Living

  • Wages, the Cost of Living, Contemporary Equivalents to Victorian Money
  • The Price of Bread: Poverty, Purchasing Power, and The Victorian Laborer's Standard of Living
  • Wages and Cost of Living in the Victorian Era
  • British Currency before 1971
  • Inflation and Contemporary Equivalents to Victorian Money
  • Classical Economists and Their Popularizers

  • Thomas Robert Malthus
  • Harriet Martineau
  • John Ramsay McCollough
  • David Ricardo
  • Adam Smith

    Opponents of the Classical Economists

  • Thomas Carlyle
  • Alfred Marshall
  • Charles Dickens
  • John Ruskin
  • The Economics of Authorship

  • The Shaping Influence of the Marketplace
  • How Did Nineteenth-Century British and American Authors Get Paid?
  • Dickens Wrote for Money!
  • Thackeray Defends Popular Culture and Professional Authors
  • Lee Erickson on Literature, the Marketplace, and the Changing Fortunes of the Nineteenth-Century Essay
  • Revolutionary Pickwick: Modern Authorship, Mass Audience, and the Victorian Publishing Industry
  • The Economics of Publication, Marketing, and Distribution

  • Publishers
  • Victorian Bestsellers, 1837-61
  • Overpricing the triple-decker
  • Mudie's and other lending libraries
  • Publishing in Parts, Periodicals, and Dickens's Working Methods
  • Triple-deckers
  • How Nineteenth-Century British and American Books (Considered as Physical Objects) Differed
  • The Economics of Victorian music publishing and performance
  • English Reprints (Thackeray)
  • European Reprints and Translations (Thackeray)
  • Copyright

  • Copyrights and Contracts (chapter in Philip Shillingsburg's Pegasus in Harness: Victorian Publishing and W. M. Thackeray
  • Copyright law and piracy of music
  • Nineteenth-Century British and American Copyright Law
  • From Pirates to Partners: Thackeray's American Publishers
  • Dickens's 1842 Reading Tour: Launching the Copyright Question in Tempestuous Seas
  • Dickens's 1867-68 Reading Tour: Re-Opening the Copyright Question
  • A Canadian Satirist Looks at Nineteenth-Century British and American Copyright Law
  • The Visual Arts

  • Victorian Art Criticism and the Rise of a Middle-Class Audience
  • Conservative Reactions to the Rise of a Mass Audience for the Arts
  • Victorian Art Criticism: Battling for the Minds of the Audience
  • The Power of the Press and Victorian Art Criticism
  • Related Victorian Political History

  • Chartism and The Chartist Movement
  • Reform Acts
  • Child Labor
  • Social Class
  • Capitalism
  • Corn Laws
  • The South Sea Bubble
  • Reviews

    The Industrial Revolution: Selected Bibliographies


    Last modified 13 March 2014