In her writings we have the exaggerated recoil of womanhood against two great evils which the sex has borne with the dumb patience of despair for generation after generation. The first is marriage without love, and the second maternity without consent. — 'The Novel of the Modern Woman', p. 66

Biographical Material

Bibliography

Works

Grand, Sarah. ‘The New Aspect of the Woman Question’, North American Review 158 (1894).

____. The Heavenly Twins. In Three Volumes. London: William Heinemann, 1893; also available on Project Gutenberg.

____. The Beth Book, Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius. London: William Heinemann 1897; also available on Project Gutenberg.

____. Ideala. London: Richard Bentley 1889; Project Gutenberg.

____. Adnam’s Orchard. London: William Heinemann, 1912.

____. The Winged Victory. London: William Heinemann, 1916.

Secondary Sources

Aslami Zarena. The Dream Life of Citizens: Late Victorian Novels and the Fantasy of the State. New York: Fordham University Press, 2012.

Bonnell, Marilyn. ‘The Legacy of Sarah Grand’s The Heavenly Twins: A Review Essay’. English Literature in Transition 36:4 (1993), 467-78.

Forward, Stephanie. ‘Attitudes to Marriage and Prostitution in the Writings of Olive Schreiner, Mona Caird, Sarah Grand and George Egerton’, Women’s History Review, vol. 8, no. 1, 1999.

Gorsky, Susan. ‘The Art of Politics: The Feminist Fiction of Sarah Grand’. Journal of Women’s Studies in Literature 1 (1979): 286-300.

Grand, Sarah. ‘The New Aspect of the Woman Question’, North American Review 158 (1894).

____. The Heavenly Twins. In Three Volumes. London: William Heinemann, 1893; also available on Project Gutenberg.

____. The Beth Book, Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius. London: William Heinemann 1897; also available on Project Gutenberg.

____. Ideala. London: Richard Bentley 1889; Project Gutenberg.

____. Adnam’s Orchard. London: William Heinemann, 1912.

____. The Winged Victory. London: William Heinemann, 1916.

Heilmann, Ann. New Woman Strategies: Sarah Grand, Olive Schreiner, Mona Caird. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2004.

____. New Woman Fiction: Women Writing First-Wave Feminism. New York: Palgrave, 2000.

Heilmann, Ann and Stephanie Forward, eds. Sex, Social Purity, and Sarah Grand: Journalistic Writings and Contemporary Reception. London and New York: Routledge, 2000.

Huddleston Joan. Sarah Grand (Mrs Frances Elizabeth McFall, nee Clarke), 1854-1943: A Bibliography. St. Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1979.

Jusová, Iveta. The New Woman and Empire. Columbus: The Ohio State University Press, 2005.

Kersley, Gillian. Darling Madame: Sarah Grand and Devoted Friend. London: Virago, 1983.

Ledger, Sally. ‘The New Woman and the Crisis of Victorianism’. Cultural Politics at the Fin- de-Siecle, ed. by Sally Ledger and Scott McCracken, 22-44. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

___. The New Woman: Fiction and Feminism at the Fin de Siècle. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997.

Lister, S.P. Sarah Grand and the Late Victorian Feminist Novel. MS, Manchester Polytechnic, 1977.

Lowenstein, Adam Seth. ‘Not a Novel, nor Even a Well-Ordered Story: Formal Experimentation and Psychological Innovation in Sarah Grand’s The Heavenly Twins’. Studies in the Novel. Vol. 39, 4, 2007.

Magnum, Teresa. Married, Middle-Brow, and Militant: Sarah Grand and the New Woman Novel. Ann Arbor University of Michigan Press, 1998.

"The Novel of the Modern Woman." Review of Reviews. Vol. X (July-December 1894). June: 64-74.

Pykett, Lyn. The ‘Improper’ Feminine: The Women’s Sensation Novel and the New Woman Writing. London: Routledge, 1992.

Richardson, Angélique. Love and Eugenics in the Late Nineteenth Century: Rational Reproduction and the New Woman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Simek, Laureen. ‘Feminist “Cant” and Narrative Selflessness in Sarah Grand’s New Woman Trilogy’, Nineteenth-Century Literature , Vol. 67, No. 3 (Dec. 1, 2012), 337-365.

Stubbs, Patricia. Women and Fiction: Feminism and the Novel 1880-1920 . London: Methuen, 1981.


Created 18 September 2021L