Users should consult the seventh edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers and Theses (2009), which advises (a) omitting URLs unless absolutely necessary since they often change but, if necessary, (b) placing them between angle brackets: < http://www.victorianweb.org/misc/cite.html>. Contributors to this site should include URLs because, as on online publication, the Victorian Web uses them to create links to the Internet source document.

1. To cite the entire Victorian Web in a bibliography, use the following form:

Victorian Web. < http://www.victorianweb.org/ >. Web. Date viewed.

2. To cite a lexia — individual document — in the Victorian Web in a bibliography, use the following form:

Lastname, Firstname. "Title." Victorian Web. < Complete url >. Web. Date viewed.

Allingham, Philip V. "Nineteenth-Century British and American Copyright Law." Victorian Web. < http://www.victorianweb.org/ authors/dickens/pva/pva74.html >. Web. 23 December 2004.

Bloy, Marjorie. "Victorian Legislation: a Timeline." Victorian Web. < http://www.victorianweb.org/history/legistl.html >. Web. 16 April 2006.

4. To cite a text in the Victorian Web that originally appeared in print:

DeLaura, David J. Hebrew and Hellene in Victorian Literature: Newman, Arnold, and Pater. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1969. Victorian Web. Web. 5 April 2010.

5. To cite a Victorian text edited for the Victorian Web

Maurice, Frederick Denison. "Prosperity and Adversity (1851)." The Victorian Web. Ed. George P. Landow. http://www.victorianweb.org/religion/sermons/maurice1.html. Web. 8 June 2005.

Babbage, Charles. The Ninth Bridgewater Treatise, 1837. The Victorian Web. Ed. John van Wyhe. http://www.victorianweb.org/science/science_texts/bridgewater/babbage_intro.htm. Web. 14 May 2001.

Note: in March 2007 an attentive contributor wrote to point out that our citation form differs from that used by the MLA, which is correct, and to ask if Brown University should be added as the sponsoring institution. No. Brown University has never sponsored or supported the site, funded the development of its almost 46,000 documents, or their maintenance online, although for a few short years in the late 1990s the wonderful people at the Scholarly Technology Group hosted it on their server.

Related Materials


Victorian Web Overview

Last modified 5 April 2010