Introduction

The name of Royal Doulton is today synonymous with the best in fine bone china tableware alongside their crinolined lady figurines. So it's difficult to believe that the company's fortunes were founded upon the making of salt glazed stoneware sewer pipes. It all began shortly after the Battle of Waterloo when in 1815 a young John Doulton set up his own pottery in Fulham at a cost of It all began shortly after the Battle of Waterloo when in 1815 a young John Doulton set up his own pottery in Fulham at a cost of £100.

Henry Doulton, son of the founder, was responsible for the diversification from sanitary and other industrial and chemical products. The situation of the pottery close to the Lambeth School of Art prompted Sir Henry, to employ several lady students and set up an Art Pottery which grew throughout the 1870's. Since then the company has achieved international fame for its extensive range of wares and products The Royal Warrant was awarded in 1901 by Edward the Seventh. Possibly the most desirable of all Doulton's products were made at this period of the firm's history - stoneware art pottery.

Doulton collectors understand that when it comes to collecting stonewares its usually a question of names and size. Important artists to look out for include the great and celebrated Victorian sculptor, George Tinworth, Mark V. Marshall and his grotesque beasts, Frank Butler and his high relief work. The most prominent lady artists were the Barlow sisters of Hannah, Florence and Lucy, Hannah being the more famous of the three. Others are Eliza Simmance, John Broad and the work of decorators and designers such as Francis C Pope, Harry Simeon, Leslie Harradine, Vera Huggins and Agnete Hoy. — Alison Davey of AD Antiques Ltd.

Sculpture

Architectural uses

Memorial Plaques

Vases, Jugs, Ewers, and other household objects

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Last modified 13 April 2014